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So does this mean that the old- fashioned face-to-face pick-up line is dead? For users such as student Mohita Jain, 23, dating apps have their time and place, but after a while, can ironically become work."Looking through an unlimited number of profiles can be really overwhelming and time-consuming," she says, adding that she no longer uses dating apps after trying them for six months.Still, he says the industry of bringing new people together socially represents a fast-growing US

So does this mean that the old- fashioned face-to-face pick-up line is dead? For users such as student Mohita Jain, 23, dating apps have their time and place, but after a while, can ironically become work."Looking through an unlimited number of profiles can be really overwhelming and time-consuming," she says, adding that she no longer uses dating apps after trying them for six months.Still, he says the industry of bringing new people together socially represents a fast-growing US$1 billion-revenue-a-year market in Asia.He adds: "There is an upward trend in the adoption of online dating by more traditional-minded Singaporeans in recent years." Dating apps may have encouraged a more lively and casual dating scene, but they have also created a new set of concerns regarding safety and harassment, especially of female users.

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So does this mean that the old- fashioned face-to-face pick-up line is dead? For users such as student Mohita Jain, 23, dating apps have their time and place, but after a while, can ironically become work.

"Looking through an unlimited number of profiles can be really overwhelming and time-consuming," she says, adding that she no longer uses dating apps after trying them for six months.

Still, he says the industry of bringing new people together socially represents a fast-growing US$1 billion-revenue-a-year market in Asia.

He adds: "There is an upward trend in the adoption of online dating by more traditional-minded Singaporeans in recent years." Dating apps may have encouraged a more lively and casual dating scene, but they have also created a new set of concerns regarding safety and harassment, especially of female users.

All it takes is for you to download an app on your smartphone and connect via your Facebook account to start your hand-held quest for romance. I think getting to chat first is a great asset if you’re shy about making the first move in real life.

In Singapore, there are more than 10 apps that are in the business of love, including home-grown companies such as Paktor and Lunch Click, which have local user figures that range in the high six figures. MR LEONARD WHANG, who uses dating apps such as Tinder and Paktor It is no wonder that young men such as Mr Oh have become converts.

Ms Lim, 36, says: "Dating apps have low barriers to entry, so safety was our priority.

billion-revenue-a-year market in Asia.He adds: "There is an upward trend in the adoption of online dating by more traditional-minded Singaporeans in recent years." Dating apps may have encouraged a more lively and casual dating scene, but they have also created a new set of concerns regarding safety and harassment, especially of female users.

IT technician Leonard Whang, 28, who, like many of his peers, uses dating apps such as Tinder and Paktor, says the apps help people overcome the fear of rejection that comes with asking someone out face to face.

He says: "When using an app, you don't know if someone has swiped left on your profile, you find out only about the positive matches.

"I think getting to chat first is a great asset if you're shy about making the first move in real life." Paktor may have impressive user numbers, but Mr Chua Joo Hock, managing director of Vertex Ventures, a global venture capital platform which has invested up to US.5 million (S.1 million) in the dating app, estimates that Singapore is three to five years behind the United States, which is at the forefront of online dating, in terms of online dating social acceptability.

For the three Korean-American sisters behind the San Francisco- based app Coffee Meets Bagel, the experience of their female users was key.

Ms Dawoon Kang, 32, a co-founder of the app, which is reported to have 21 million users in the US alone, says: "We realised that career-focused women don't have time for bulls*** and want quality over quantity.